Pokemon GO: Perspectives from a Random Lecturer in Singapore

Pokemon GO has been making waves in Singapore since it’s launch just a few days ago.

It has managed to do what Singapore’s Health Promotion Board has been trying to do, get people to exercise! And then there is this awesome Republic Polytechnic lecturer that lays down the rules against playing Pokemon GO in class!

I’m no Pokemon fan. I belong in the age of Doraemon. I’m also one of the curious lecturer who downloaded the app to see what my students are exactly enjoying. Students always seem so surprised that lecturers are also playing Pokemon and gossiping exchanging information about students, doing the things that students do. But hey! Have they forgotten that we are humans too?

In my opinion, every hype and fab that our students are into, there’s usually a positive outcome for teachers and lecturers to dabble into. Pokemon GO is no exception. In fact, it is so big that the rewards are many folds bigger for teachers and lecturers to reap.

(1) Pokemon GO gives me an instant shared experience to connect with my students.

Such rare opportunities provided me with the chance to break the barriers with students, especially those who I may not have connected well with in a class of 20 to 24. “By the way, have you check out the Pokestop at the fountain? Remember to top up your Pokeballs on your way to the MRT”.

Pokestop at NYP

(2) Pokemon GO gives me a language to talk to my students.

Want to go through all the Pokestop in the shortest amount of time to get your refill of Pokewares? Here’s your motivation to learn about the Travelling Salesman Problem. Can’t get my students to understand a theory in class? Whip out a Pokemon metaphor, they might just get it. Pokemon GO is probably doing very well in this aspect. It is complicated enough, in the sense that I can see lots of science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics behind the game. An art in every design and a technology to drive every enjoyment.An expressive example for some pretty confusing theories.

A common question I get from some people: You’re a lecturer and an educator, shouldn’t you be frowning upon games in the first place?!

Short answer: Why, whatever for? Everything in moderation. Work hard, play harder. Life’s too short not to have some fun?

TL;DR answer: Taking away the extremes, the fanatical bad publicity that Pokemon GO has accumulated which included trespassing and getting into car crashes, I placed great trust that my students will game on in a moderate manner. No need to discourage, just need to encourage them to get their priorities right if they have not done so.

After all, I am an avid gamer myself, a Level 80 Maplestory Ice Mage (without the use of 2x Exp cards mind you), guilty of playing Maplestory quietly at the back of the lecture theatre and taking photographs of lecture materials in the age when camera phones are still sucky and Nokia still champs (I use a real point and shoot camera with a tripod!). Hey, I still score an A for my AI lecturer~

The world already expects the next generation to be super-humans in many aspects; I think they should just be more human instead.

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My First Self-Authored Paper

It was always a dream for me to share and contribute unique ideas on a world stage. On 13 Jun 2016, I got a little breakthrough at Turku, Finland, through the 12th International CDIO Conference, presenting the first paper which I wrote as a solo author, Industry-Inspired Experiential Learning and Assessment of Teamwork (see Page 469/470).

Perhaps this idea is not that unique unique. Original and fresh perspectives at methods found in real life would probably be how I liked to describe it. It was a small piece of work, considering that a team of psychologists from the Individual and Team Performance Lab, University of Calgary also presented something on teamwork, an excellent piece of work (Please check it out here!) which was practical, structured and on a titanic scale.

Not to mention that I had to rush out of the conference venue immediately after my presentation to meet a collaborator, leaving no time to network with those who are interested in my work.

The very next day, I saw this (see 4th tweet):

IMG_20160614_090622-edit

The conference organisers picked up on my research and highlighted it on their Twitter. I’m really excited about it.

Not just that, there were at least three other people at the conference who remembered my face, my name and my research. A Brazilian who worked in the aerospace industry who consulted me on leadership training for their student-trainees, a lecturer from UK who we only met over 20 seconds over the conference dinner complimented my work, and, the psychologists from the University of Calgary, who also remarked that it was a good piece!

In fact, only now, after the conference, checking out from the tweets, it might be because it was the University of Calgary who had first picked up on my research. In an attempt to reach out to me, they tweeted globally. The conference organisers followed up on that tweet and highlighted my research. No matter what the case, it is something that really excites me and I can say I am proud of.

To the ITP Lab team from University of Calgary at CDIO, thank you for reaching out to me.

I’m also glad I attended both the paper presentation and workshop by the University of Calgary too. I really learnt a lot from their experiences; they are after all the experts in this field, backing their methods by strong research. If you are interested to check out their work, I’ve put a link to their website above. The tool is free to use too I believe.

 

At last, a breakthrough, a small win. 🙂